The   kaghakatsi   Armenian   community   in   Sydney   has   lost   one   of   its most    beautiful    pillars    of    society:    Angelle    Benneian,    a    charming, sophisticated lady with the very loving nature.               Angelle   was   born   in   Jerusalem   in   1927,   the   seventh   of   nine   children to   Sahag   and   Nazouhie   Nercessian.   She   was   married,   at   the   young   age of only 14, to Kevork Benneian, and bore him 5 children.      She leaves behind a dozen grandchildren.                Ever   graceful   and   self-possessed, Angelle   exuded   a   lingering   charm that   touched   people.   Even   in   the   face   of   terminal   cancer   she   remained strong   and   positive,   fighting   against   the   creeping   disease   with   every last breath.                The   eulogy   read   at   her   funeral   ceremony   by   Australia's   primate Archbishop   Aghan   Baliozian,   noted   that   she   will   be   remembered   "for many   things   but   mainly   for   her   courage   to   confront   all   the   challenges thrown   at   her,   her   strong   faith   in   God   which   never   wavered   even   at the   worst   moments   of   her   life,   her   infectious   positive   attitude   and most   of   all   her   loving   nature.   She   loved   her   family   and   her   friends,   she loved joy, laughter, beauty and music but most of all she loved life."
Armenian Jerusalem
The Armenian Quarter
This project has been supported by the Gulbenkian philanthropic Foundation, the Armenian Patriarchate of Jerusalem, and members of the worldwide Armenian community. Reproductions of the genealogical documents [domar’s] are courtesy Photo Garo, Jerusalem. Copyright © 2007 Arthur Hagopian
This project has been supported by the Gulbenkian philanthropic Foundation, the Armenian Patriarchate of Jerusalem, and members of the worldwide Armenian community. Reproductions of the genealogical documents [domar’s] are courtesy Photo Garo, Jerusalem. Copyright © 2007 Arthur Hagopian
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